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EDITIONS
Monday, 12 March, 2001, 08:16 GMT
Hammond report at-a-glance
The report by Sir Anthony Hammond QC
Good reading for Mr Mandelson: the Hammond report
Sir Anthony Hammond's long-awaited report into allegations that Peter Mandelson and Europe Minister Keith Vaz improperly intervened in a passport application by two wealthy Indian brothers runs to 116 pages.

Here are the main points:

  • The passport applications of GP Hinduja and SP Hinduja were handled properly although some aspects of SP Hinduja's case "should have been pursued more vigorously" by the Home Office.

  • No minister used "improper pressure" on behalf of the brothers' applications.

  • There was no evidence of an improper relationship between the brothers and Europe Minister Keith Vaz. Although he made representations on their behalf, he did so for many others.

  • Mr Mandelson or his officials made or passed on enquiries to the Home Office on behalf of SP Hinduja and Prakash Hinduja.

  • It was not possible to reach firm conclusions about the exact circumstances in which the contacts took place in relation to Mr SP Hinduja, but it was likely that Mr Mandelson spoke directly to Home Office Minister, Mike O'Brien.

  • Mr Mandelson's belief that the had not had a telephone conversation with Mr O'Brien was honestly held.

  • Mr Mandelson did not make representations on behalf of either Mr SP or Mr Prakash Hinduja.

  • There was no evidence of any improper relationship between him and the Hindujas or of any connection between his contacts with them over the sponsorship of the Millennium Dome and their efforts to obtain naturalisation."

  • There was inteligence material about the Hinduja brothers. It was not drawn to the attention of the Home Office but, if it had been, it would not have affected the outcome of their applications.

  • In some respects, the processing of the naturalisation application by the Home Office could have been improved, but systems were now in place to address those issues.

  • Record keeping in ministers' private officers was, in some respects, unsatisfactory and there was a need to address the issue and that of the monitoring of telephone calls.

  • See also:

    09 Mar 01 | UK Politics
    08 Mar 01 | UK Politics
    08 Mar 01 | UK Politics
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