BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: UK Politics
Front Page 
World 
UK 
UK Politics 
Interviews 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 



BBC diplomatic correspondent Barnaby Mason
"The government has included all the obvious candidates"
 real 28k

Wednesday, 28 February, 2001, 22:32 GMT
Islamic militant groups face ban
Hamas fighters
Hamas is one of several Palestinian groups on the list
Several radical Islamic groups from the Middle East are among 21 foreign organisations that the UK Government intends to ban under new anti-terrorist legislation.

UK Home Secretary Jack Straw announced the list of organisations on Wednesday, saying he was satisfied that they were involved in terrorism.

Middle Eastern groups on the list
Al-Qaida
Egyptian Islamic Jihad
Al-Gama'at al-Islamiya (Egypt)
Armed Islamic Group (Algeria)
Salafist Group for Call and Combat (Algeria)
Lebanese guerrilla organisation Hezbollah
Hamas
Palestinian Islamic Jihad
Palestinian Abu Nidal Organisation
Islamic Army of Aden (Yemen)
Mujaheddin-e Khalq (Iran)
The list includes Al-Qaida, the organisation of the Afghan-based Saudi-born dissident, Osama bin Laden, and anti-Israeli groups Hamas, Hezbollah and Islamic Jihad.

A number of groups fighting for Islamic states in Egypt, Algeria and Yemen also feature, as well as the Iraq-based Iranian opposition group Mujaheddin-e Khalq.

But Home Office Minister Charles Clarke denied that the list was anti-Muslim, although nearly three-quarters of the groups on it are Islamic.

And he said that the ban was not directed against groups campaigning peacefully against injustice.

Mr Clarke denied that Britain was acting at the bidding of foreign governments, though several had made representations. Al Qaida, for instance, is blamed by the United States for a number of attacks on Americans.


When drawing up the list, the government considered whether a group had a policy of attacking civilians, Mr Clarke said.

The law gives police powers to seize assets and arrest those who use violence or the threat of it "for the purpose of advancing a political, religious or ideological cause".

Even fund-raising or openly supporting a banned organisation could lead to arrest.

The list is subject to parliamentary approval.

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE
See also:

19 Feb 01 | Talking Politics
Head to Head: New Terrorism Act
28 Feb 01 | UK Politics
More 'terror' groups face ban
28 Feb 01 | UK Politics
UK to ban Tamil Tigers
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more UK Politics stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more UK Politics stories