BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: UK Politics
Front Page 
World 
UK 
UK Politics 
Interviews 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 

Wednesday, 31 January, 2001, 20:13 GMT
Bids in for air traffic control plans
Gatwick Airport
The proposed partial sell-off of Nats is controversial
The government has confirmed that it has received bids from the three groups invited to compete for a stake in National Air Traffic Services (Nats).

Controversy has surrounded ministers' plans for partial privatisation of the service and the proposals have come under fire from unions and backbenchers.

The shortlist includes the Airline Group, which brings together British Airways and Virgin Atlantic with six other UK airlines.

Nimbus, which has also submitted a bid, is a consortium which includes Serco, the UK facilities management group.

The final bid comes from the Lockheed Martin-backed Novares group.

Union opposition

The Institution of Professionals, Managers and Specialists, the air traffic controllers' union, has campaigned hard against the planned public-private partnership for Nats.

According to the plans, the scheme would give a 46% stake to a strategic private sector partner, with 5% allocated to Nats staff and a 49% share kept by the government.

A spokesman for the Department of the Environment Transport and the Regions confirmed the three bids had been received.

"The government will now evaluate these bids with a view to selecting a strategic partner and implementing the PPP - public-private partnership - in spring 2001."

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE

Features

Analysis
See also:

01 May 00 | UK Politics
Prescott bid to avert air traffic revolt
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more UK Politics stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more UK Politics stories