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Wednesday, 3 January, 2001, 16:11 GMT
More countries in pet scheme
Dog in quarantine
Fewer pets will have to endure six months quarantine
The passports for pets scheme is to be extended to include a further 28 countries and territories from the end of January, the government has announced.

Dogs and cats from rabies-free islands such as Jamaica, New Zealand and Australia will be able to enter the UK without having to spend six months in quarantine.


The Pet Travel Scheme was warmly welcomed by pet owners when it was introduced in February last year

Baroness Hayman
The move, which comes into effect on 31 January, will add to the existing 22 western European countries already included in the scheme.

Junior agriculture minister, Baroness Hayman said: "The Pet Travel Scheme was warmly welcomed by pet owners when it was introduced in February last year.

"Since then over 12,500 dogs and cats have successfully entered the UK using it."

Baroness Hayman said there were enormous benefits for both animals and their owners in avoiding quarantine.

Baroness Hayman
Baroness Hayman made the announcement
The government was working with a number of airlines who hoped to provide transport for qualifying pets from February 2001, she said.

British Midland are already operating the pet passport scheme for the Ministry of Agriculture out of Heathrow.

And the scheme is also operating on Calais to Dover sea routes, Eurotunnel Shuttle services and certain sea routes into Portsmouth from France.

Criteria

People wanting to travel with their pets to the British Isles have to meet certain criteria including vaccination against rabies and blood tests to check that the injections have worked.

They must also be fitted with a microchips and receive treatment for a variety of parasites such as exotic ticks.

The programme was first launched in February 2000 for cats and dogs although it is planned to extend it to dozens of other animals, including rabbits, gerbils and mice.

The new countries and areas are:

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Ascension Island
  • Australia
  • Barbados
  • Bermuda
  • The Cayman Islands
  • Cyprus
  • The Falkland Islands
  • Fiji
  • French Polynesia
  • Guadeloupe
  • Hawaii
  • Jamaica
  • Japan
  • La Reunion
  • Malta
  • Montserrat
  • New Caledonia
  • New Zealand
  • St Helena
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Vincent
  • Singapore
  • Vanuatu
  • Wallis and Fortuna.

  • See also:

    03 Aug 99 | UK Politics
    Pets' passport to freedom
    26 Feb 00 | UK
    Dog has its day in Chunnel
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