Page last updated at 16:16 GMT, Thursday, 8 October 2009 17:16 UK

Shots fired at cell death funeral

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Three men fired shots into the air over the coffin

A volley of shots has been fired over the coffin of the dissident republican who died at a PSNI station on Saturday.

Four men dressed in paramilitary style uniform and black masks flanked John Brady's coffin at his sister's home on the Drumrallagh estate in Strabane.

One man shouted orders in Irish and three fired shots into the air over the coffin, which was draped in a tricolour with a black beret and gloves on top.

The coffin was then taken to Immaculate Conception Church for Requiem Mass.

Several hundred mourners clapped and cheered after the shots were fired and a police helicopter flew overhead.

Later, Fr Declan Boland told mourners at Requiem Mass that his family had a right to know exactly how he died.

Fr Boland said investigations into his death must be thorough.

John Brady
John Brady was found dead in a cell at Strand Road police station

It is understood that Brady took his own life at Strand Road PSNI station in Londonderry on Saturday.

He was arrested on Friday over an alleged assault.

His family said they were concerned over the circumstances of his death which is now being investigated by the police ombudsman.

The 40-year-old was on weekend parole from prison when he was arrested.

He was serving the final part of a sentence for the murder of a police officer during the Troubles, to which he pleaded guilty in 1991.

RUC Reserve Constable David Black died after an under-car booby-trap bomb exploded near his home on the outskirts of Strabane 20 years ago.

'Revoked'

Brady was released under the terms of the Good Friday Agreement but his licence was later revoked and he was returned to prison in November 2003.

It is understood that, before his latest arrest, he was due for release in a matter of weeks.

Last year, Brady was charged with putting a bomb under the car of a former RIR soldier in 2002.

However, the charge of attempted murder was dropped over concerns about the reliability of low copy number DNA evidence, which had been criticised during the Omagh bomb trial.



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