Page last updated at 16:52 GMT, Thursday, 11 February 2010

Body releases transfer exam marks

Eleven-plus

The overall results of one of the two post-primary transfer tests in Northern Ireland have been released.

The Post-Primary Transfer Consortium, which mainly consists of Catholic schools, said that out of 6,500 entrants, 3,000 were awarded A grades.

Six hundred got the B1 grade, 658: B2, 513: C1, 567: C2 and 1,164 got a D.

The other exam was organised by the Association for Quality Education. It gave out marks rather than grades in its results.

Fourteen thousand pupils in total sat the tests, with some sitting both. They received their grades on Saturday.

Last year, almost 6,000 pupils who sat the last 11-plus exam were awarded A grades.

That was about 25% of the total year group, including those who did not sit the test.

Arrangements

Meanwhile, the Association for Quality Education has said a higher proportion of prep school pupils who applied for special access arrangements were granted them, compared to other pupils who asked for extra time or special treatment.

However, the association said there was no favouritism involved.

A total of 6.5% of prep school pupils who sat the tests won concessions, compared to 4% of all the children who did the exams.

It is understood, out of 274 pupils allowed special arrangements by the AQE, about 35 were from prep schools.

The body said most of all those who applied had valid reasons and only ten were rejected.

The association said some parents had asked for a number of different concessions but had not been granted them all.

The 11-plus ended after the Education Minister, Caitriona Ruane, introduced regulation abolishing academic selection.

However, grammar schools then pressed ahead with setting their own transfer examinations, the first of which were held at the end of last year.



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