Page last updated at 08:28 GMT, Thursday, 11 June 2009 09:28 UK

Omagh bomb organiser's drive ban

Seamus Daly
Daly failed to appear at Carrickmacross District Court

One of the organisers of the Omagh bombing has been banned from driving for 12 months.

Earlier this week, Seamus Daly was successfully sued by relatives of some of the 29 people murdered in the 1998 atrocity in a landmark civil action.

Daly of Kilmurray, Culloville, Castleblayney, County Monaghan, was due before Carrickmacross District Court on Wednesday.

He did not appear, but proceedings against him continued regardless.

He faced a series of driving offences. These included failing to produce insurance and driving without a licence at Tullyvaragh, Carrickmacross, on 27 November last year.

Daly also failed to produce insurance and a driving licence when stopped in Carrickmacross Court car park on December 10, the court heard.

In addition to banning Daly from driving for 12 months, Judge Sean McBride also fined the 34-year-old builder 3,250 euro.

In 2004, Daly was sentenced to three-and-a-half years in jail in the Republic after he admitted being a member of an illegal organisation.

The BBC's Panorama programme said mobile phone evidence also linked Daly to car bombings in Lisburn and Banbridge as well as Omagh.

Beaten up

Earlier this month, he required hospital treatment after he was beaten up by a number of men in Carrickmacross.

On Monday, Mr Justice Morgan ruled at the High Court that Real IRA leader Michael McKevitt was responsible for the Omagh bombing.

He also found Liam Campbell, Colm Murphy and Daly liable for the biggest single loss of life in the Northern Ireland conflict.

Twelve relatives were awarded more than £1.6m in damages.



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