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Tuesday, 7 March, 2000, 17:43 GMT
Omagh bomb accused refused legal aid
The accused appeared at Dublin's Special Criminal Court
The accused appeared at Dublin's Special Criminal Court


The man accused of plotting the bombing of Omagh in 1998 has been refused legal aid in Dublin.

A total of 29 people died and more than 200 were injured in the bomb in the County Tyrone town.

Colm Murphy, 46, from Ravensdale, Co Louth, faces a charge at Dublin's anti-terrorist Special Criminal Court of conspiring with another person to cause the explosion.

Michael O'Higgins, barrister for the accused father-of-four, told the court on Tuesday that his client had been a publican and ran a construction firm.

But after he was charged, Murphy's business had "sunk like a stone," and he now had no income. The estimated legal cost of his case was IR£120,000.

Presiding judge Mr Justice Frederick Morris turned down the application for legal aid on the grounds that money had been lodged in a bank account in the name of Murphy's wife and children, and he had until recently been "a relatively wealthy gentleman".

A date has still to be fixed for the trial of Murphy - the only person yet to be charged in connection with bomb attack on Omagh by the Real IRA terrorist group.

It is not expected to start until late this year.

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