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Last Updated: Thursday, 3 August 2006, 08:07 GMT 09:07 UK
What the papers say
papers
Journalist Mike Philpott takes a look at what is making the headlines in Thursday's morning papers.

Several of the local front pages feature a picture of two teenagers arriving at Belfast International Airport at the end of their holiday.

One of them is Gareth Richardson, who survived being shot in the chest after being caught in crossfire between two rival drug gangs in Ibiza.

His friend Niall Hamilton remains in hospital on the Spanish island.

The girl was detained for writing her name on Derry's walls and was accused of criminal damage and then had a mugshot taken, was fingerprinted, and had to give a sample of DNA
Daily Ireland

The News Letter reports that the families involved are "planning to take legal action against the Spanish police because of the way in which their sons were treated".

The Belfast Telegraph says they were "interrogated heavily" and "their apartment was searched for drugs".

Gareth's father, Tom, says he was amazed that innocent bystanders could be treated in such a way by a police force in a European country.

Daily Ireland concentrates on the treatment of an 11-year-old girl by the police service in Northern Ireland.

The paper says she was detained for "writing her name on Derry's walls, was accused of criminal damage and then had a mugshot taken, was fingerprinted, and had to give a sample of DNA".

Her father tells the paper that "she was treated in the same way as someone arrested for murder".

'Older houses'

The Irish News reports on attempts by the authorities in Donegal to crack down on what it calls "bungalow blight".

From next week, it says, anyone buying a new house there will have to live in it for seven years.

The aim is to ensure that holidaymakers do not own more than one in five of the homes in any location.

But the paper says the ruling by Donegal County Council does not apply to older houses.

The ambassador says Mr Blair's close association with President George Bush has destroyed his influence
Financial Times

Tony Blair comes under sustained attack for his handling of the crisis in the Middle East.

The Daily Mail says he has flown home into a mutiny in his party. It describes him as "increasingly out of touch".

The Daily Telegraph feels that "disarray in the government means that Britain is a feeble figure on the international stage".

The former British Ambassador to Moscow, Sir Rodric Braithwaite, delivers a devastating assessment in the Financial Times.

'Foreign policy disaster'

He says "Mr Blair's close association with President George Bush has destroyed his influence".

And he asks: "Who bothers with the monkey when you can go straight to the organ grinder?"

The former Conservative Foreign Secretary Sir Malcolm Rifkind writes in the Independent that Mr Bush and Mr Blair "have presided over a foreign policy disaster that surpasses even Suez or Vietnam".

Barney the Doberman Pinscher is in the doghouse after savaging more than 100 antique teddy bears that he was supposed to be guarding at an exhibition in Somerset
The Mirror

At the other end of the news scale, the Daily Telegraph has some welcome information for fans of Star Trek. Or at least those of them with money.

More than 1,000 pieces of memorabilia from the six television series and 10 movies are about to go on sale.

Those who are so inclined can bid for pieces of the bridge from the Starship Enterprise, a Vulcan officer's dress, or the captain's chair from a Klingon war vessel.

Online bidders will be able to join in. Cue the headline: "It's a sale, Jim, but not as we know it."

Finally, Barney the Doberman Pinscher is in the doghouse after savaging more than 100 antique teddy bears that he was supposed to be guarding at an exhibition in Somerset.

As the Daily Mirror among others points out, one bear, called Mabel, once belonged to Elvis Presley.

It is a gift for the headline writers. "You ain't nothing but a hound dog," says one.

"All shook up," says another. But perhaps the best is in the Telegraph, which says: "I just wanna eat your teddy bear."




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