[an error occurred while processing this directive]
BBC News
watch One-Minute World News
Last Updated: Thursday, 22 June 2006, 07:18 GMT 08:18 UK
Reaction to Monsignor Faul's death
Leading figures in Northern Ireland have been paying tribute to prominent Catholic clergyman Monsignor Denis Faul.

Monsignor Faul died on Wednesday at the age of 74 after a long illness.

ARCHBISHOP SEAN BRADY, CATHOLIC PRIMATE OF ALL IRELAND

Sean Brady
Archbishop Brady said Father Faul stood up for what he believed in

"Denis Faul stood up for what he believed in, stood up for the distraught, no matter what their class, religion or background.

"With valour and hope he unstintingly gave his advice, assistance and support, never counting the cost or risk to himself.

"He realised clearly that justice is not a casual by-product of peace, but something anterior and fundamental to any lasting peace."

AUSTIN CURRIE, FOUNDING MEMBER OF THE SDLP

"Monsignor Faul will rightly be remembered by most for the courageous part he played in ending the hunger strikes and thereby saving lives.

"But he also deserves to be commemorated with deep gratitude for the exposure of brutality and torture in the period following internment and, consistent with his unremitting opposition to violence in all its forms, his principal activity over so many years as an advocate and defender of civil and human rights."

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

"His willingness to take risks for what he believed to be right was admired by many whose thoughts he echoed when speaking out strongly and courageously against what was wrong and evil in our society."

MAURICE MORROW, DUP CHAIRMAN

"The death of Denis Faul marks the passing of a man who was never prepared to shy away from the difficult issues of the day.

"He did not seek the popular route when expressing his views and on many occasions made a strong contribution to a range of issues in the province."

GERRY ADAMS, SINN FEIN LEADER

Gerry Adams
Mr Adams said Father Faul played a pivotal role in the 1970s and 80s

"Although Irish republicans and Fr Faul seriously differed, particularly around the 1981 hunger strike, he nonetheless played a pivotal role in the 1970s and 80s in highlighting human rights abuses by the British state.

"Along with the late Fr Brian Brady, Fr Raymond Murray, and Fr Des Wilson, and a number of human rights groups like the Association for Legal Justice, Fr Faul was instrumental in drawing attention to collusion, torture, and shoot-to-kill actions by British forces."

TOMMY MCKEARNEY, HUNGER STRIKER FOR 53 DAYS IN 1981

"Father Faul was a very brave person, exposing the cruelties and brutalities being used by the state against the nationalist and republican population.

"He did so very forthrightly and courageously, along with one or two others, Monsignor Murray and Father Brady, at a time when few others were giving them support.

"He opposed in principle the first and second hunger strikes - he made his opposition to it plain - but having said that, he endeavoured to ensure that the demands that we were asking for, which in his opinion were broadly speaking very justified, would be brought about."

ARCHBISHOP ROBIN EAMES, HEAD OF THE CHURCH OF IRELAND

Archbishop Robin Eames
Archbishop Eames said Monsignor Faul was man of integrity

"I have learned with sadness of the death of Monsignor Faul whom I always regarded as a man of integrity and spiritual strength.

"I was privileged to know him, and on several occasions to be associated with him in matters of concern to both our communities.

"I extend my sincere sympathy to Archbishop Brady and the members of the Faul family."

MARK DURKAN, SDLP LEADER

"He was a fearless opponent of all violence and a staunch challenger of any injustice that he saw. He was a man of great courage and integrity, as well as of deep faith.

"In dark days in the north, his was a clear and responsible voice of truth, compassion and Christianity.

"He was strong in his views and straight in all he said and did, both privately and publicly.

"He will be rightly remembered for speaking out against all injustice and working for a better country for all."

DANNY KENNEDY, ULSTER UNIONIST DEPUTY LEADER

"Monsignor Faul was recognised as a person of integrity who was very strongly opposed to violence.

"He held republican principles, and whilst forthright, he always respected the views of others.

"His knowledge on education was of considerable benefit to the wider community. His contribution will be greatly missed, particularly at a time when important and impending decisions are to be taken on the issue.

"Monsignor Faul was a fearless and consistent critic of violence and was respected as such within the unionist community."

DERMOT AHERN, IRISH FOREIGN MINISTER

"He was a tireless and courageous advocate for peace and justice, and over many years was an outspoken campaigner for the protection and advancement of the human rights of all, and especially of the most vulnerable.

"Fr Faul has left a lasting legacy for all who continue the work to build a peaceful and stable future for Northern Ireland. He will be very sadly missed."

LORD MAGINNIS OF DRUMGLASS, FORMER UUP MP

"I've known him as a fellow school teacher but also as a friend, as somebody with real humanity, a real Christian concern, particularly during the difficult years in Northern Ireland.

"He was somebody who cared, whomever it was that suffered."

IVAN MCELHINNEY, PRESIDENT OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

"Monsignor Denis Faul was a man of high personal integrity. Incredibly courageous and fearless, he was a severe critic of terrorist activity.

"While sympathetic to the republican cause, he was most vocal in his opposition to the IRA hunger strike of the 1980s - a stance which caused him dearly in his personal life.

"He was held in high esteem by many outside his own church in which he was a respected pastor and educator."

DAVID FORD, LEADER, ALLIANCE PARTY

"He always spoke as he saw things, no matter who was made uncomfortable by the things he said.

"He will be remembered for his contribution to ending the hunger strike, and his concern for victims right across the community in latter years.

"I and everyone in the Alliance Party send my condolences to his family and the many people who knew him well."

DENIS WRIGLEY, MARANTHA COMMUNITY

"He would always say what was on his heart, irrespective of the consequences.

"A mercurial figure, but one who always asked the right questions. Some would say that he didn't always give the right answers. I believe that asking the right questions is the right thing to do.

"As a Christian, I saw him as my brother. I know he had pain, he hid it a lot. He had pain in recent months. To me, he was the kind of straightforward man who was respected ultimately by everybody.

"His contribution in the last 30 years is beyond measure. Even the people he crossed swords with, very often became very close friends."






FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

PRODUCTS & SERVICES

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific