BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: N Ireland  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Wednesday, 22 January, 2003, 12:24 GMT
Hume 'passed on' information
Methodist Central Hall
Methodist Central Hall is inquiry's new home
A former army commander has told the Bloody Sunday Inquiry that Foyle MP John Hume gave him information about terrorist activity in the Bogside area of Londonderry.

Mr Hume has denied the claim.

Colonel Roy Jackson, who was the commanding officer of the Royal Anglians, said Mr Hume came to him with a priest in August 1971.

The colonel told the inquiry that Mr Hume suggested he look in a certain place in the Bogside where there "may be some arms or explosives".

Inquiry chairman Lord Saville stopped further questions being asked about this on the grounds that the tribunal had to be very careful for security and similar reasons.

Mr Hume has described the allegation as "absolute nonsense" and "completely untrue".

He said he would not have had a clue where the arms dumps were located.

John Hume: Foyle MP and former leader of the SDLP
John Hume: Foyle MP and former leader of the SDLP

The tribunal will decide later on Wednesday if it is going to pursue the matter.

The Saville Inquiry is investigating what happened on 30 January 1972 when paratroops opened fire on civilians at a civil rights march in the Bogside in Londonderry killing 13 people. Another man died later.

On Tuesday, Colonel Jackson told the Saville Inquiry that the Parachute Regiment should not have been sent into the Bogside in armoured cars on Bloody Sunday.

Colonel Jackson said this forced the rioters back into the Bogside when the idea was to surround them and pick them up at army barriers.

The colonel also said he told every battalion coming to Derry that it was very difficult to tell where a shot had come from because of the "typography and geography" of the area.

He said this phenomenon was known as the "Londonderry echo".

Colonel Jackson was the army's longest serving commander in Northern Ireland at the time, having served two years in the province.

The Saville Inquiry was set up by Prime Minister Tony Blair to reinvestigate the evidence because the relatives felt the first inquiry was a whitewash.

Lord Saville and the Commonwealth judges who comprise the inquiry, are not expected to report back until 2004.

The inquiry, which usually sits at the Guildhall in Derry, is currently hearing the evidence from military witnesses in London because of concerns for their safety.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
BBC NI's Paul McCauley:
"John Hume says it is absolute nonsense to suggest he gave information to the army"
Find out more about the Bloody Sunday Inquiry


30th Anniversary

CLICKABLE GUIDES

ARCHIVE VIDEO
See also:

20 Jan 03 | N Ireland
16 Jan 03 | N Ireland
15 Jan 03 | N Ireland
14 Jan 03 | N Ireland
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more N Ireland stories are at the foot of the page.


 E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more N Ireland stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes