BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: N Ireland  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Thursday, 12 December, 2002, 12:04 GMT
Call for counterfeit clampdown
About 600,000 has been recovered this year
About 600,000 has been recovered this year
Police in Northern Ireland have urged retailers to help in the clampdown on counterfeit money.

Fraudsters are passing off fake sterling and euro notes in stores across the province.

Police figures released on Thursday revealed that currency with a face value of more than 600,000 has been recovered this year.
Chief Inspector Mark Mason:
Chief Inspector Mark Mason: "Counterfeiters want to dupe everyone"

Detectives advised shopkeepers in border areas to watch out for fake euro notes.

The situation in Northern Ireland is more difficult because four banks issue their own sterling tender in addition to Bank of England notes.

Chief Inspector Mark Mason said: "The counterfeiters want to dupe everyone and their products are now of a quality that a cursory check of a note is not sufficient."

The police have urged business owners to train staff in a bid to detect the fake notes.

Crime branch

They said about 14,000 of counterfeit money was recovered in 1995 in 428 investigations.

Last year, that figure increased to almost 2,000 incidents and police fear there will be an upsurge in incidents over Christmas.

"We are not trying to be Christmas killjoys, but we want to make it as difficult as possible for the crooks to pass their fakes," said Ch Insp Mason.

Detective Constable Geoff Allen of the PSNI's crime branch said some of the forged currency was quite sophisticated.

"But one thing is for sure - if it is difficult for the counterfeiters to pass the notes, then they are going to go to the easiest place to pass them.

"We can reduce this problem by checking our notes more thoroughly."

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
BBC NI's Julian Fowler:
"No bank will change a forged note so if you accept one you've lost its value"
See also:

06 Aug 02 | N Ireland
20 Dec 01 | Business
16 Sep 02 | N Ireland
13 Sep 02 | N Ireland
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more N Ireland stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more N Ireland stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes