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Monday, 26 August, 2002, 18:01 GMT 19:01 UK
Police warned over DNA testing
Police have issued an artist's impression of the baby
Police have issued an artist's impression of the baby
The police have been warned against carrying out DNA testing of men as part of their investigation into the death of an unidentified baby found on the outskirts of Belfast.

The baby, named Carrie by police, was found in a bin liner near the Lough Moss leisure centre in Carryduff last March.

She had been stabbed 11 times and had severe head injuries.

Detectives have already tested women in the area and say they won't rule out doing the same with local men.


To start doing another mass DNA testing in the Carryduff area, this time of men, is a questionable use of very scarce police resources at this time

Monica McWilliams Assembly member

However, the leader of the Womans Coalition Monica Mc Williams said mistakes had already been made during the investigation and should not be repeated.

"From the very start I have questioned the way the police have gone about this in terms of initiating a murder hunt in relation indeed to the mother herself which I felt would make her very reluctant to come forward if she was a victim," she said.

"To start doing another mass DNA testing in the Carryduff area, this time of men, is a questionable use of very scarce police resources at this time."

In May, the police carried out extensive DNA testing of women in the area.

'Dignity'

On Sunday, police launched a poster appeal ahead of the baby's funeral later this week.

Police issued an artist's impression of the baby, who is to be buried on Thursday after an interdenominational service.

Chief Superintendent Roy McComb said the burial was the right thing to do "morally, spiritually and ethically".

"We want to treat Carrie with the dignity that she was not afforded due to the circumstances of her birth and death," he said.

The officer said he believed the funeral was what the baby's mother would want.

Posters bearing the image of baby Carrie are being placed around Carryduff by police in a fresh bid to get the mother to come forward.

See also:

26 Aug 02 | N Ireland
21 May 02 | N Ireland
24 May 02 | N Ireland
28 Mar 02 | N Ireland
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