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Thursday, 11 July, 2002, 09:10 GMT 10:10 UK
New inquiry call over Army killings
The Bogside in Derry
Manus Deery was shot dead in the Bogside area
A nationalist pressure group has said it has received new information about the killings of a man and a teenager by the Army in Northern Ireland in the 1970s.

The Pat Finucane Centre in Londonderry said the new evidence showed the state failed in its duty to properly investigate the shootings.

The information, in a letter from the Northern Ireland Office (NIO), refers to a number of cases including that of 15-year-old Manus Deery, shot dead in the Bogside in 1972.

The Army on patrol in Derry in 1972
The Army on patrol in Derry in 1972
It also deals with the killing of Jim Gallagher, shot dead when the bus he was travelling on passed Fort George Army base in 1976.

Both families have called on the Director of Public Prosecutions to release further details of the investigations into the killings.

In the case of Manus Deery, the letter says the Ministry of Defence deemed the soldier who fired the shot acted outside the Army's guidelines for the use of firearms.

His family have said it is the first time this has been admitted by the authorities.

'Rules breached'

"The NIO have officially confirmed that the MoD deemed opening fire on Manus to be outside the rules laid down by the yellow card and the DPP didn't prosecute," said his sister Helen.

"We didn't know the MoD had been saying they breached their own rules."

She said the family never accepted the Army's statement that shots were fired at a gunman in the area.

The family's solicitor said a new investigation was the only way forward.


The DPP see Jim as another number, another statistic

Fiona Byrne
The NIO also said the soldier prosecuted in Jim Gallagher's case, served half of his five-year sentence for unlawful killing.

Until now, his family had wrongly believed the soldier had won an appeal against his conviction.

His sister, Fiona Byrne, said the family felt they had been treated shamefully by the authorities.

"The DPP see Jim as another number, another statistic," she said.

The Pat Finucane Centre, named after a solicitor murdered in Belfast in 1989, operates an advice centre in Derry and mainly deals with complaints from nationalists and republicans.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
BBC NI's Keiron Tourish:
"Both families are pressing the DPP for more information"
See also:

24 Nov 00 | N Ireland
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