BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: N Ireland  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Thursday, 11 July, 2002, 11:44 GMT 12:44 UK
Disputed parades on talks agenda
Violence broke out after a parade last month
Violence broke out after a parade last month
Controversial marches in north Belfast have been discussed at a meeting between Sinn Fein and the Parades Commission.

A delegation from the republican party met the commission on Thursday morning.

Sinn Fein asked the commission to review its decision to allow two contentious marches to pass through nationalist areas.

The parades along the Springfield Road in west Belfast and the Crumlin Road in north Belfast have led to serious disturbances in the past.

There are disputes over a number of parades in Belfast on Friday - the Twelfth of July - which is the biggest day in the Protestant marching season calendar.


The Parades Commission should have accepted a moderate adjustment to the parade route

Alex Attwood
SDLP

Meanwhile, the Springfield Residents' Action Group (SRAG) has withdrawn a protest application in respect of the Springfield Road parade.

SRAG said it believed its proposals would have led to a local accommodation and a positive outcome.

SDLP assembly member for west Belfast Alex Attwood said: "The presence of any Orange parade on the Twelfth morning and evening on the nationalist part of the Springfield Road is unwelcome.

"The Parades Commission should have accepted a moderate adjustment to the parade route whereby the parade would have come on to the Springfield Road 30 feet from its previous point of entry."

Influence and authority

Last month, violence broke out after a controversial Orange Order parade in the same area.

Bottles and stones were thrown at police by nationalists after the Orange parade made its way through west Belfast to Whiterock Orange Hall.
John Reid: Secretary of State
John Reid: Warning

A crowd of about 300 nationalists confronted the police as the marchers passed through the junction of Ainsworth Avenue and March Street and the junction of Springfield Parade and Springfield Road.

On Wednesday, Secretary of State John Reid warned no paramilitary violence would be tolerated on Northern Ireland's streets during the marching season.

Speaking in the House of Commons, Dr Reid appealed for calm during Protestant loyal order parades later this week.

He told MPs it would be a "potentially challenging and difficult weekend".

"I would appeal to anyone of any influence and authority to do all they can to make sure we come out of this weekend without the blight of violence that has too often scarred Northern Ireland," he said.

His remarks came after the scenes of violence which followed Sunday's disputed Orange Order parade at Drumcree in Portadown, County Armagh.

It was banned from marching along the mainly nationalist Garvaghy Road on its return route to the town centre.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
The Lord Mayor of Belfast Alex Maskey:
"I am urging people to exercise calm and restraint"
See also:

30 Jun 02 | N Ireland
29 Jun 02 | N Ireland
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more N Ireland stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more N Ireland stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes