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EDITIONS
Wednesday, 1 May, 2002, 14:31 GMT 15:31 UK
Ceasefire 'not enough' says Reid
Alleged activity by the IRA has provoked political row
Alleged activity by the IRA has provoked political row
The Northern Ireland Secretary of State, John Reid, has told the Commons that more is needed from the IRA than "simply a ceasefire".

Speaking on Wednesday, Dr Reid said what was needed was a "sense that the war is over".

A political row in Northern Ireland has continued in recent weeks over the status of the IRA ceasefire.

There have been allegations the IRA trained Colombian guerillas in weapons and was involved in a raid on a police Special Branch office at Castlereagh in Belfast on 17 March.

Northern Ireland Secretary John Reid
John Reid: Asked to assess IRA ceasefire

Dr Reid said that he believed the leadership of republicanism wanted the peace process to work, but he said there must be an end to all paramilitary attacks and targeting.

Ulster Unionist leader David Trimble said the secretary of state should have gone further.

Mr Trimble told the Commons that it was time for the Government to demand that paramilitaries disband and make it clear that the war really was over.

On Tuesday, Ulster Unionist leader David Trimble told the secretary of state that the government must recognise the seriousness of Northern Ireland's political situation

During talks at Westminster, Mr Trimble asked John Reid to clarify what the government believed the definition of the IRA ceasefire to be.

'Still active'

Also on Tuesday, SDLP leader and Deputy First Minister Mark Durkan said he believed the IRA was "still active".

Mr Durkan was speaking after meeting Sinn Fein President Gerry Adams at Stormont.

He also said there was also a credibility problem with the intelligence services.

However, Mr Adams again maintained that the IRA ceasefire was intact, and said people should focus on other issues.

Last October, Dr Reid said the government no longer recognised the ceasefires of the UDA/UFF - the largest loyalist paramilitary organisation - and the smaller, splinter group, the Loyalist Volunteer Force.

It followed the murder of a County Armagh journalist and an upsurge in street violence.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
BBC NI's Mark Simpson:
"The secretary of state said police chiefs had told him the ceasefire was not under threat"
BBC NI's Stephen Walker:
"Castlereagh and the IRA ceasefire dominated proceedings"

Key stories

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SPECIAL REPORTS
See also:

30 Apr 02 | N Ireland
29 Apr 02 | N Ireland
30 Apr 02 | N Ireland
27 Apr 02 | N Ireland
26 Apr 02 | N Ireland
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