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EDITIONS
Friday, 26 April, 2002, 07:41 GMT 08:41 UK
Sunday witness 'will give identity'
Guildhall in Londonderry
Inquiry is hearing evidence at Londonderry's Guildhall
A civilian alleged to have fired a shot on Bloody Sunday in Londonderry is to reveal his identity at the Saville Inquiry.

The 49-year-old man from Derry, currently known as witness X, has denied that he fired any shots.

The Saville Inquiry, sitting in Derry, is examining the events of 30 January 1972 when 13 civilians were shot dead by British Army soldiers during a civil rights march in the city. A 14th person died later.

Witness X had demanded anonymity and to be hidden by screens when he gave his evidence.

But now he has decided that he will testify in front of the families, the public and the media and that he will allow his name to be used.

Army unit on Bloody Sunday in Derry
Soldiers in Derry on Bloody Sunday

However, he will ask the inquiry to rule that his photograph should not be taken as his job takes him into loyalist areas throughout the northwest of the province.

Witness X is alleged to have told the police in 1972 that he was a member of the Provisional IRA and that he fired a gun from Glenfada Park.

But he has said this is "simply not true", that he has never been a member of the IRA and was at home on Bloody Sunday.

And he told the BBC that he did not say anything of this nature to the then Royal Ulster Constabulary.

He said he decided to reveal his identity because he had nothing to hide and wanted to help the inquiry in its search for the truth about what happened on Bloody Sunday.

It is not yet known when he will be called to give his evidence.

Former and serving police officers have won the right to give evidence to the inquiry from behind screens and some soldiers who fired shots on Bloody Sunday have won complete anonymity.

Search for truth

Lord Saville of Newdigate and the commonwealth judges accompanying him on the Bloody Sunday inquiry began their work nearly four years ago.

They are not expected to report back until 2004.

The Bloody Sunday inquiry was established in 1998 by Prime Minister Tony Blair after a campaign by families of those killed and injured.

They felt that the Widgery Inquiry, held shortly after the shootings, did not find out the truth about what happened on Bloody Sunday.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
BBC NI's Paul McCauley reports:
"Witness X has denied that he told the RUC 1972 he was a member of the IRA and fired a gun on Bloody Sunday"
Find out more about the Bloody Sunday Inquiry


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07 Mar 02 | N Ireland
04 Feb 02 | N Ireland
13 Feb 02 | N Ireland
18 Feb 03 | N Ireland
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