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Sunday, 11 November, 2001, 12:40 GMT
Northern Ireland honours war dead
Lord mayor Jim Rodgers laid a wreath at the cenotaph
Lord mayor Jim Rodgers laid a wreath at the Cenotaph
Thousands of people gathered across Northern Ireland on Sunday to remember the dead of two world wars and other conflicts.

The main remembrance services took place in Belfast, Londonderry, Enniskillen, Lisburn, Bangor and Newtownards.

The main service was at the cenotaph at Belfast City Hall, where Lord Mayor Jim Rodgers laid a wreath on behalf of the people of the city.

For the first time wreaths bearing the name the Police Service of Northern Ireland were laid.

In Castlereagh, east Belfast, members of the Police Federation and RUC Widows' Association took part in a service at the war memorial.

Police reforms

Iona Myers, whose RUC husband was shot dead in Belfast, said she was upset the police reforms had been implemented now.

"The timing of the change - coming at the start of Remembrance week - was another bitter blow," she said.

"We knew the change was coming and to a certain extent, while we didn't like it, we had accepted it. But just to come when it did was wrong."

Mr Rodgers said it was a poignant moment, as it was the first time that wreaths were laid bearing the name of the new Police Service of Northern Ireland, instead of the Royal Ulster Constabulary.

In Dublin, the Irish president Mary McAleese attended an ecumenical service of remembrance.

The Queen led the nation's tributes to the war dead at the annual service of remembrance in London.

The London service was attended for the first time by US ambassador William Farrish who had been invited to take part following the 11 September terror attacks.

Representatives of Commonwealth governments are normally the only foreign officials who attend.

New York fire chief Joe Callan, who survived the collapse of the World Trade Center, marched alongside British firefighters to the Cenotaph.


We will remember other people who died - the victims of 11 September

Tony Blair
Mr Callan and New York police lieutenant Frank Dwyer were special guests at the Royal British Legion's 80th anniversary Festival of Remembrance at the Royal Albert Hall on Saturday.

The Queen and other members of the Royal family also attended, as did Prime Minister Tony Blair, his wife Cherie and his father Leo Blair.

Remembrance Sunday and Armistice Day were commemorated on the same morning for the first time since 1990.

US victims remembered

The Queen headed the traditional wreath laying ceremony at the Cenotaph, followed by the country's politicians.

Since the end of World War I 83 years ago, numerous British service men and women have died in 70 conflicts and peace keeping missions around the globe.

Tony Blair
Tony Blair: "Evil of global terrorism"
Sunday's service was also an opportunity for people to remember the victims of the US terror attacks.

Mr Blair compared the 11 November armistice with the 11 September atrocities.

He said that while remembering those who fought in the two world wars in the traditional two-minute silence at 1100GMT, "we will remember other people who died - the victims of 11 September".

Writing in the Mail on Sunday, he said: "Several thousand died on that terrible day.

"Every one was somebody's son, somebody's daughter.

"Every one was murdered by an evil which we must fight - the evil of global terrorism.

"With the pace of modern life, memories can be short. We move on. We get on with our lives.

"But we should never forget what happened on 11 September.

"Never forget the sickness we felt as it dawned on us that this was no accident."

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 ON THIS STORY
The BBC's Nick Thatcher
"The memories of war are still vivid"
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