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Solicitor for bereaved relatives Greg O'Neill:
"We want to get the endorsement of the political establishment for our calls for the disclosure of information"
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Thursday, 15 March, 2001, 09:35 GMT
Bomb victim families meet MPs
Dublin and Monaghan bombings: 33 died in Troubles' bloodiest day
Thirty-three died on the Troubles' bloodiest day
Relatives of those killed and injured in the Dublin and Monaghan bombings have briefed MPs about their campaign for a public inquiry into the atrocities.

Thirty-three people died and hundreds were injured when three loyalist bombs exploded in the Irish Republic on 17 May 1974.

It was biggest loss of life on a single day in the course of the Troubles.

The delegation to the House of Commons appealed for people in Britain and abroad who may have information to come forward and assist the Independent Commission of Inquiry.

This was set up by the Irish Government to look into the bombings.

The delegation highlighted the progress made, to date, in its investigations.

It also intended to identify the category of military, security and intelligence personnel it wished to contact.

'Establishment endorsement'

The relatives have established a campaign body, Justice for the Forgotten, with the aim of seeking a public inquiry in the Irish Republic.

The campaign's legal team has been in talks with the Independent Commission of Inquiry for the past six months.


It is not clear as to whether the security forces in Northern Ireland turned a blind eye and allowed those suspected of carrying out the Dublin-Monaghan atrocity to enjoy a safe haven in Northern Ireland

Greg O'Neill
Justice for the Forgotten says the British authorities have not co-operated fully with investigations into the atrocities.

Solicitor for six of the families of the bereaved and injured, Greg O'Neill, said: "We are looking for the endorsement of the political establishment for our calls for the disclosure of information to the commission in Dublin.

"We hope to get the support of the former secretaries of state in Northern Ireland who have come out in support of the plight of the Omagh victims."

'Not fundraising'

"It is generally believed that those who were murdered in Omagh, lost their lives at the hands of the Real IRA.

"But it is not clear as to whether the security forces in Northern Ireland turned a blind eye and allowed those suspected of carrying out the Dublin-Monaghan atrocity to enjoy a safe haven in Northern Ireland."

Relatives of those killed and injured in the Omagh bomb were at the Commons on Wednesday to launch their campaign to raise money to take a private legal action.

Mr O'Neill said his group was not fundraising.

The bombings took place while loyalist workers held a general strike in Northern Ireland to bring down the power-sharing government set up under the Sunningdale Agreement.

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See also:

14 Mar 01 | Northern Ireland
Omagh civil action bid launched
12 Sep 00 | Northern Ireland
Minister meets bomb victim families
17 May 00 | Northern Ireland
Victims of bombings remembered
05 Aug 99 | Northern Ireland
Inquiry call into 1974 loyalist atrocity
14 May 00 | Northern Ireland
Bombing victims remembered
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