[an error occurred while processing this directive]
BBC News
watch One-Minute World News
Last Updated: Saturday, 23 April 2005, 23:16 GMT 00:16 UK
From the editor's desktop: Your response

Pete Clifton, the editor of the BBC News website for some of the past week, looks back at an unusual time in the newsroom - read a selection of your comments.

Your comments:

I liked the 'Guest Editor's Pick of the Week' for the way it included the stories that weren't necessarily those that had received blanket media coverage during the week, or that were the 'stories behind the stories'. They aren't always easy to find on the site due to the volume of other stories, but they are what BBC Online is best at.
Kate, Hertford, UK

The editor asks for suggestions about the site. How about then having a new category under 'Entertainment' called 'Celebrity' or some such. Then nonsense like the main story at the moment in TV & Radio (Vic Reeves driving ban) which has got nothing at all to do with TV or Radio, can be moved out to a place where people who like that kind of stuff can find it, and those of us who don't care one jot about Vic Reeves (or any other celebrity) don't have to see it.
Nigel Goodman, Hornchurch/UK

The mad rush to the barricades you describe, illustrates the self-importance of the media generally.
Duncan, Cambridge

I think the pick of the week is an especially good idea, as it would cater to those of us with little time, as well as allowing us to see what you, the BBC team, were particularly proud of!
Nida, London

The mad rush to the barricades you describe, illustrates the self-importance of the media generally. You act as if it is a life-saving emergency when it makes no difference to anyone whether we hear the news about the Pope within one minute or one day.
Duncan, Cambridge

You mention that 'excellent material does not stay in the shop window long enough,' to me this seems like a solvable problem.

I know that during the day the website stories change quite often and you must be getting through the queue. I'm a late worker and often visit the site in the middle of the night but find myself disappointed to discover few changes have taken place on any of the sections. Now it's not my job to point out to you that a great many of your readers reside outside the UK in different time zones, neither is it my job to remind you that you are answerable mainly to the UK licence fee paying audience, however I'd suggest you consider this point as it could only have beneficial results.

Would it be so hard to post some of that extra quality content more often during YOUR wee hours?
Kader, Galway Ireland

Why do I have to insult and criticise the work of the BBC to be in with a chance, however small, to guest-edit the BBC web page? It's not fair. I've been fairly impressed and pleased over the past two and a half years.

There is one suggestion, however, that I strongly believe in. Weeks ago, it was reported that a pilot scheme in Austria, where citizens were equipped with cameras to produce their own, ultra-local news, was a success.

This idea is great, and I would very much like to see the BBC team up with existing infrastructure to try and provide such services.
Robert Holbach, Pontypridd, UK

The most interesting part of this column is understanding how the editorial decisions are made.
Thomas Murphy, Crowthorne, England
I've just read your blog - thanks for keeping up with the times! I've been writing one since January, and find it very cathartic. Blogs are a human form of reporting- they don't generally pretend to be unbiased, and they are much more entertaining for it. A breath of fresh air in the site. Keep it up!
Bridget Kenyon, Warwick/UK

I'd just like to agree with James Davies of Aberdeen. The most interesting part of this column is understanding how the editorial decisions are made and why you take stance A rather than stance B.

I like the idea of guest editors but it would be good to capture more of the decision-making processes your guests go through so that we can all appreciate rather more than perhaps we do what actually goes in to the creation of a website like this.

I speak as one who is often outraged by various slants the BBC puts on stories so would be keenly interested to understand the thinking that goes behind story selection and angles.
Thomas Murphy, Crowthorne, England

This column is a self-indulgent waste of electricity. I am switching off.
Timon, Bath, England

I can't believe people take the time to write and complain about something where there's nothing to complain about. Your editorial is not only worthy, but it lets us know just what it takes to make the best news website in the world. (I hope I won't be ignored because I am not shouting in capitals or being mean minded.)
Bruce, Ayr, Scotland

It's a shame to read people's negative comments about this website. I glance at it at least daily to read the headlines and I find it possibly the best news resource on the internet. Keep up the good work.
Sean Gibson, Vienna, Austria

A face behind the page! It is good to see who does all the work. Still the best news website, must hit it every hour in the office. I do miss Ivan Noble's diary.
Andrew, UK

Re: Your three point mission statement.
How about number 4? Getting rid of unnecessary management-speak gerunds.
Matthew Cobb, Manchester, UK

I've not read any of your articles before, but I like the idea of an open dialogue with the editor. And I definitely like the idea of a 'Pick of the Day' link. I've found it frustrating before now to be chatting to someone in the office about a piece I read that morning only to find it's disappeared or been demoted. Things change so fast in the news world that an opportunity to reminisce is welcome.
Nicola Johnson, Cape Town, South Africa

It was refreshing to see a programme where the producer was far more concerned with being honest, than broadcasting a facade of impartiality.
David Barr, Hamilton, Lanarkshire, Scotland
Re: The whingeing from Brookes and Leggett.
Photographers are over-rated. Pointing a camera in the right direction and clicking is much easier than stringing sentences together into matchless prose. Don't pay for your photos if you can get equally good ones for nothing!
Herbert, Lees

I very much enjoyed your editors desktop surprise guest. While I expect the BBC (and if you have doubts, think about what the letters stand for) to be completely impartial, it was refreshing to see a programme where the producer was far more concerned with being honest, than broadcasting a facade of impartiality.
David Barr, Hamilton, Lanarkshire, Scotland



 



FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

PRODUCTS & SERVICES

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific