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Last Updated: Wednesday, 8 February 2006, 20:12 GMT
Heritage site road plans revealed
Traffic near Stonehenge
The aim is to remove traffic from near Stonehenge
Five options designed to protect Stonehenge for the future have been unveiled by the Highways Agency.

The aim is to remove traffic from the World Heritage site, provide a bypass for Winterbourne Stoke and reduce accidents at the Wiltshire site.

Following a public inquiry in 2004 a new dual carriageway and a 2.1km bored tunnel was suggested.

Ministers have since asked for a cheaper option after the tunnel's costs spiralled from 284m to 470m.

The four alternatives to the published scheme for the bored tunnel are:

  • A northern route - which would have a junction with the A360 then go south of Larkhill and rejoin A303 at the Countess roundabout at Amesbury. It would involve a cut-and-cover tunnel.

  • A southern route - which would have a junction with the A360 then go south of Stonehenge before rejoining the A303.

  • A cut-and-cover tunnel - like the first tunnel scheme - but closer to the surface than a bored tunnel.

  • A partial solution - which would include closing the A344 at its junction with the A303 and offer options for the end of the Winterbourne Stoke bypass.

    English Heritage said until this latest review was completed, it would remain a supporter of the long bored tunnel.

    "Any alternative would need to offer benefits that are comparable to this scheme," said a spokesperson.

    An exhibiton of the options was due to open on Friday.

    A government decision is due next year.




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    SEE ALSO:
    Cheaper tunnel option put forward
    23 Jan 06 |  Wiltshire
    Stonehenge tunnel plan cash blow
    20 Jul 05 |  Wiltshire


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