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Last Updated: Monday, 3 May, 2004, 13:05 GMT 14:05 UK
Stroke victims mobility device
Many strokes are caused by blood clots travelling to the brain
New technology is being developed which could help people recover after a stroke.

Researchers at the University of Bath and the Chippenham Stroke Unit are working on a device for people who have suffered paralysis.

The device, which fits inside caps or gloves, stores data which can be read by users to see if they are taking enough exercise to restore mobility.

The design is expected go into commercial production by 2006.

Dr Christopher Eccleston, from the University of Bath, said: "This project will develop new devices that will help many thousands of stroke victims in the UK to recover some of the use of paralysed limbs by improving home-based exercise.

"They will allow rehabilitation to continue after physiotherapy comes to an end and so will prove an invaluable aid to recovery."

The devices are to be worn for part of the day; storing data electronically when the stroke victim moves.

This will tell them if they need to do more exercise and if they need to vary their movement or try for better balance.

Researchers are also exploring the possibility of the device being remotely connected to equipment in a GP or physiotherapist's office so that expert feedback will also be possible.

The prototypes will be tested in Bath and Sheffield in mid-2005.




SEE ALSO:
Migraine 'may raise stroke risk'
28 Jan 04  |  Health
Stroke warning to binge-drinkers
16 Dec 03  |  Health
Stroke risk 'determined in womb'
20 Jun 03  |  Health


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