Page last updated at 08:20 GMT, Thursday, 17 September 2009 09:20 UK

Six arrested over dumped rubbish

Bags at Mr Brett's home
Police were inside Mr Brett's house when the bags of rubbish were dumped

Six people have been arrested after bags of rubbish were left outside the home of Leeds's council leader amid a strike by refuse collectors.

The bags were dumped on Richard Brett's doorstep on Wednesday, as the strike by refuse collectors and street cleaners in the city entered its 10th day.

The bags had posters attached which read "solidarity with striking Leeds refuse collectors".

Police said four men and two women had been arrested and were in custody.

Depot pickets

West Yorkshire Police are also investigating a threatening message left on Mr Brett's answerphone.

In the message, the caller accused the councillor of lying about the industrial action, then went on to say "be ready Mr Brett".

Unions have said they do not condone any threats and there was "no evidence" to connect it to their members.

Council employees have been picketing refuse depots in the city since the strike began on Monday last week.

The GMB and Unison unions are unhappy with what they say are proposals by the authority to cut their pay by up to £6,000 a year from February 2011.

The council, which is run by a Conservative-Lib Dem coalition, has brought in private contractors and agency staff to help clear rubbish from the city.



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