Page last updated at 14:43 GMT, Saturday, 17 April 2010 15:43 UK

Volcanic ash keeps Birmingham Airport closed

Cancelled flights
UK airspace was closed as the ash cloud spread across the country

Birmingham Airport is remaining closed for a fourth day as a ban on flights in English airspace is extended until at least 1900 BST on Sunday.

Ash from a volcano in Iceland blowing over the UK prompted the ban, first introduced on Thursday.

National Air Traffic Service (Nats) said on Saturday that the ash cloud was "moving around and changing shape".

Passengers hoping to travel are advised to contact their airline for details on their flights.

In a statement on its website, the airport said: "We realise that this has been a difficult time for passengers and we would like to thank everyone for their patience."

The ash, from the volcano in Eyjaffjalljokull, has caused airport and aircraft movement shutdowns in other parts of Europe, including France, Sweden, Finland, Denmark and Holland.

Aircraft have been grounded because of the danger to engine from tiny particles of rock, glass and sand.



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