Page last updated at 12:58 GMT, Friday, 3 April 2009 13:58 UK

Doubt over jobs at MG car plant

Longbridge
Car production resumed at the former MG Rover plant in 2008

Around a fifth of the workforce at the MG plant in Birmingham could lose their jobs, the car manufacturer has said.

MG Motor UK Ltd said 30 employees were at risk of redundancy following a review and restructure of business operations at the Longbridge site.

The company, previously Nanjing, said it could not make assurances of long-term employment stability for staff due to the current economic climate.

Production of the MGTF sports car restarted at the factory last year.

Early action

A statement from MG Motor UK said: "The unique trading conditions we are currently operating in make any assurances of long-term employment stability difficult to predict.

"Following a review and restructure of its business operations the company has abided by the statutory consultation process and placed a number of employees 'at risk' of redundancy.

"MG UK has always maintained that its workforce would be preserved in line with the ongoing needs of the business and sustainability has and will continue to be a priority as the economy experiences unique trading conditions."

The company added that by taking early action it hoped further redundancies could be avoided.

Nanjing bought MG Rover's assets following the collapse of the company nearly four years ago.

The Chinese firm recently re-branded itself as MG Motor UK Ltd.



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