Page last updated at 14:12 GMT, Wednesday, 18 June 2008 15:12 UK

Laptop stolen from doctor's home

The health records of nearly 11,000 patients are on a laptop stolen from the Wolverhampton home of a GP.

The doctor, who has not been named, works at the Castlecroft Medical Practice in the city.

The information was not encrypted to make it difficult to access, as health guidelines say it should be.

But a practice spokesman said the information was protected with a complex password system which would be difficult to crack.

Confidential records

The information on the laptop included names, dates of birth, addresses, contact details and confidential records.

The practice has written to all of its patients to inform them of the matter.

Senior partner Dr Peter Wagstaff said the practice was treating the matter seriously.

Police have warned that identity theft could now be an issue

"Though not encrypted, the confidential information on the laptop was protected by a complex password system, which only a person with specialist computer knowledge would be able to crack," he said.

Department of Health guidelines state any confidential information about patients must be stored in safe and secure environments.

Jon Crockett, chief executive of Wolverhampton Primary Care Trust, said an investigation would be carried out but added that the doctor had been a victim of crime.




SEE ALSO
More MoD laptop thefts revealed
21 Jan 08 |  UK Politics
'No cover-up' on lost driver data
18 Dec 07 |  UK Politics



FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC iD

Sign in

BBC navigation

Copyright © 2017 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific