Page last updated at 07:12 GMT, Wednesday, 11 November 2009

Project to rescue historic quay

Jeremy Pritchard, managing director of North Shields Fish Quay Ltd

Millions to rescue fishing quay

A multimillion-pound project has been announced to rescue an ageing historic Tyneside fish quay.

The £5.7m scheme will ensure the future of the western Quay in North Shields as a base for the area's fishing fleet.

The quay, which is owned by the Port of Tyne, has suffered from decades of use by vessels and from tides and weather.

The cost will be shared between the European Fisheries Fund, North Tyneside Council, regeneration agency One North East and the Port of Tyne.

North Tyneside's elected mayor Linda Arkley said: "Western Quay is vital to the success of the local fishing industry and the future of North Shields Fish Quay.

"It is where the bigger fishing vessels berth and an integral part of the visitor experience to North Shields."

Alan Clarke, chief executive of One North East, added: "This project is essential for large-scale fishing to continue in north-east England, which currently supports around 1,200 regional jobs."

The work, to be project managed by the Port of Tyne, is due to start on 16 November.



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
Dredger starts work on River Tyne
10 Nov 09 |  Tyne
Bid to regenerate quay buildings
19 Oct 06 |  Tyne

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific