[an error occurred while processing this directive]
BBC News
watch One-Minute World News
Last Updated: Tuesday, 15 March, 2005, 10:29 GMT
Deep voices sound out attraction
David Beckham
David Beckham is seen as attractive despite his high-pitched voice
When it comes to success with women, men with deep, gravely voices are likely to win out, according to new research from Northumbria University.

An on-going study found that both men and woman rated deep voices more highly than higher pitched ones.

Postgraduate research student, Sarah Evans, said that the human voice may be an important but overlooked factor in human attraction.

She believes that a deep voice could signal genetic fitness.

Ms Evans said: "I recorded a number of men speaking and also took photos of them.

'Potential mate'

"Men and women were asked to rate the voices on things like attractiveness, dominance, confidence, sexiness etc. They were then shown photos, separately, and asked to rate them.

"Both women and men rated deep voiced men more highly.

"But what was also surprising was the men with low voices also have attractive faces. There's obviously some kind of link there, possibly testosterone.

"I think this goes back to our evolutionary past, signalling genetic fitness, and also an indication of dominance, which are all things that women will be looking for in a potential mate."

She is hoping to extend the study into the role of the male voice in competition with other men, and also into women's voices.




SEE ALSO:
Our animal instincts
14 Feb 05 |  Magazine
Beauty in the eye of the android
11 Feb 03 |  Scotland
Secrets of human attraction
29 Aug 00 |  Science/Nature


RELATED INTERNET LINKS:
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East | South Asia
UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature | Technology | Health
Have Your Say | In Pictures | Week at a Glance | Country Profiles | In Depth | Programmes
Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific