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Last Updated: Thursday, 10 November 2005, 17:48 GMT
Man faces double jeopardy retrial
Julie Hogg
Julie Hogg's body was found behind a bath panel.
A man accused of a 1989 murder has become the first person to have his case referred to the Court of Appeal under the new double jeopardy law.

The body of Julie Hogg, 22, from Billingham, Teesside, was found hidden behind her bath by her mother Ann Ming.

William Dunlop, 42, was acquitted of Ms Hogg's murder.

As part of the 2003 Criminal Justice Act, the double jeopardy law was amended so suspects acquitted at trial could be brought to court again.

In April, police on Teesside said they were to re-examine the case of Ms Hogg.

It is now for the Court of Appeal to decide whether or not William Dunlop should be tried again for the murder of Julie Hogg
Martin Goldman,
Chief Crown Prosecutor for Cleveland

Mrs Ming has long campaigned for a change in the law to allow those acquitted to be brought back to trial if there is sufficient fresh evidence.

William Dunlop faced two murder trials, but each time the jury failed to reach a verdict and he was formally acquitted in 1991.

The Director of Public Prosecutions, Ken Macdonald, said that after looking at submissions from the Chief Crown Prosecutor for Cleveland, Martin Goldman, he was "satisfied" the Crown Prosecution Service should apply to the Court of Appeal for a re-trial.

Mr Goldman said he had decided to refer the case to Mr Macdonald after the law on double jeopardy changed and the case had been re-examined by the Cleveland Police and the CPS.

"It is now for the Court of Appeal to decide whether or not William Dunlop should be tried again for the murder of Julie Hogg," he said.

A Cleveland Police spokeswoman welcomed the decision.




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