Page last updated at 14:49 GMT, Monday, 5 April 2010 15:49 UK

Surrey infant pupils help classmate with rare cancer

Adam in July 2009, three days after diagnosis
Adam was a pupil at Wallace Fields Infant School before he fell ill

Classmates of a critically ill six-year-old boy from Surrey have been helping to raise money for a life-saving operation.

Adam Bird, of Epsom, has a rare and aggressive form of childhood cancer, known as high-risk neuroblastoma.

His family have been told that his only hope is radical treatment, available only in America, which costs £300,000.

Wallace Fields Infant School, in Ewell, has held a number of fundraising events which included a bunny hop last week.

About 100 children in the UK are diagnosed with neuroblastoma every year, with the average age for diagnosis of those affected being two years old.

The children just want to make him better, and are doing everything they can to help us raise the money in time
Nick Bird

Adam was a pupil at the school before he fell ill last July.

Head teacher Nicky Mann said: "I am so amazed and proud of our pupils.

"The extent to which they have taken on Adam's appeal is incredible; every child wants to do whatever they can to help."

Adam's father Nick Bird added that it had been particularly touching how Adam had not been forgotten, even though he had not been in school properly since his diagnosis.

"The children just want to make him better, and are doing everything they can to help us raise the money in time."

The appeal for Adam, supported by his family and friends as well as his school, has so far raised more than £14,000.



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