Page last updated at 13:49 GMT, Wednesday, 10 December 2008

Appeal over washed-up body parts

An appeal has been made for information about human body parts which washed-up on a Suffolk beach five years ago.

UK charity Missing People is trying to uncover the identity of the person.

A man's leg was found at Slaughden Quay near Aldeburgh on 9 December 2003 while part of a decomposed torso was found on the shore two-and-a-half miles away.

Suffolk Police said the investigation into the death was still open. Missing People said the remains had probably been in the sea more than three months.

They belonged to a 6ft (1.83m) tall male with a heavy build.

It is likely that this man will have family and friends out there who do not know his fate
Teri Blythe, Missing People

The charity said it had checked its missing persons records for clues to a possible identity but added "no conclusive match" had been made.

Teri Blythe, head of its identification department, said: "In most cases an unidentified person is also a missing person, so it is likely that this man will have family and friends out there who do not know his fate.

"We therefore hope that this appeal will bring some vital clues that will lead us to identify this body and put an end to someone's distress."

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SEE ALSO
Beach torso 'was man'
10 Dec 03 |  Suffolk
Coast search finds human torso
09 Dec 03 |  Suffolk

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