Page last updated at 17:27 GMT, Tuesday, 22 April 2008 18:27 UK

Tide hits bomb explosion effort

The bomb found on the coast in Felixstowe
The device is thought to be German and weighs about 1,000lb

Royal Navy divers are trying to attach an explosive charge to a 1,000lb (500kg) World War II bomb towed two miles out to sea off Suffolk.

The bomb, found on a Felixstowe beach on Monday, is now lying on the seabed.

Tidal currents prevented the divers attaching the charge but they will make more attempts later, police said.

A half-mile exclusion cordon will remain in place around the bomb until it is exploded, but people moved from their homes have now returned.

A floating raft was attached to the device by a Royal Navy bomb disposal unit and it was towed out to sea.

A police spokeswoman said: "If the operation is not successful when the tide ebbs more Royal navy divers will be called in."

Food and shelter

Hundreds of people were forced to spend Monday night away from their homes.

About 1,200 homes were evacuated, with the majority of residents staying with family and friends.

But more than 40 people sought refuge in one of the town's sports centres.

The bomb was unearthed early on Monday morning by a contractor working on the area's sea defences.

It is thought to be German in origin.

A special telephone number has been set up for anyone who needs advice or guidance - 01473 613600.




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