Page last updated at 13:35 GMT, Thursday, 14 February 2008

Statue planned of cricketing icon

Dickie Bird looks at a scale model of the sculpture
A sculpture of the cricketing icon is to be placed in Barnsley

Cricketing legend Dickie Bird will soon be a permanent fixture in his home town of Barnsley when a sculpture of the former Test umpire is unveiled.

A larger-than-life statue of the man who sent hundreds of Test batsmen packing is to be built by artist Graham Ibbeson in his South Yorkshire studio.

A copy of the bronze image will also be built in Melbourne, Australia, with a third planned for a site in India.

The work should be completed by the autumn and then unveiled in the town.

One of Mr Ibbeson's most notable works is the statue of entertainer Eric Morecambe which stands on the seafront of his home town of Morecambe in Lancashire.

That work was unveiled by the Queen in 1999.

Invited schools and colleges from across Yorkshire have been collaborating with Mr Ibbeson over the sculpture.

A unique opportunity for youngsters to be part of the creation of a major piece of public art in the community
Artist Graham Ibbeson

Youngsters are also being invited to visit the artist as the work develops from its early stages through to the completed piece.

Mr Ibbeson said the work was "a unique opportunity for youngsters to be part of the creation of a major piece of public art in the community".

He added that building the sculpture would "emphasise civic pride and personal aspiration through recognition of positive role models".

A scale model of the work will be unveiled on Thursday.

Dickie Bird was unavailable for comment.




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