Page last updated at 23:25 GMT, Thursday, 15 October 2009 00:25 UK

Soldier mocked over loss of legs

Matthew Weston
Sapper Weston wants to stay in the Army

A soldier from Somerset who lost both legs and his right arm while serving in Afghanistan has been subjected to cruel taunts over his injuries.

Sapper Matthew Weston, 20, from Taunton, stepped on a bomb while on patrol in Helmand Province on 29 June.

While he was being treated at Selly Oak hospital in Birmingham his mother took him out shopping where they encountered a group of "boisterous" youths.

Rena Weston, 40, said: "They shouted he's lost something... like his legs".

Shooting team

Speaking from the family home Mrs Weston said: "They were laughing at what they thought was a very funny statement to make.

"We continued around the corner and I put my arms around Matthew and said, 'are you okay love?'

"He just went silent. Then he said, 'I suppose I had better get used to it for the rest of my life.'

"I don't think anyone, no matter what their disability, should be treated like that," said Mrs Weston.

Since the incident Sapper Weston has finished his treatment at Selly Oak hospital.

"He's determined to stay in the Army," said Mrs Weston.

"He has trialled with the 2012 Paralympics shooting team and he's going to receive coaching and possibly be in the team, which will be a great boost for Matthew.

"We have got no choice. We have got to get on with it."



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