Page last updated at 19:18 GMT, Tuesday, 10 February 2009

River overflows by rugby ground

The footpath by Bath's Recreation Ground has been cordoned off by police after the River Avon burst its banks.

The Environment Agency said water levels had risen by up to 12ft (3.7m) in the last day.

A flood warning has been placed along the entire length of the river which stretches from Bristol to Wiltshire.

The river is expected to reach a peak level at about 1900 GMT on Tuesday but the Environment Agency does not expect significant flooding in the Bath area.

Bath Rugby Club was preparing to train at "the rec" - usually reserved for games only - because its usual locations were hit by bad weather.

It said it was a last resort to get a practice in for its away game against Worcester Warriors this weekend.

The training ground at Lambridge is flooded, the pitch at the University of Bath has been affected by snow and the "all weather terrain" pitch in South Bristol is unsafe because it is covered in ice, a spokesman said.

Bath and North East Somerset Council (BANES) said that it continued to prioritise its use of salt stocks and plans to ensure that all main routes continue to be gritted until their next delivery of salt.

Three roads in the area remain closed due to flooding - Love Hill in Timsbury, Wick Lane in Carlingcott and Priston Lane in Farmborough.

BANES say they are continuing to monitor the weather forecast and have plans in place with health and emergency services if necessary.

The council said it had supplied people whose homes are close to localised flooding with sandbags.

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