Page last updated at 14:55 GMT, Monday, 15 September 2008 15:55 UK

Study for 'greener' car battery

Professor Saiful Islam
'Green technologies' are being developed to help reduce carbon emissions

Researchers at the University of Bath are helping to develop new rechargeable batteries for hybrid electric cars.

Professor Saiful Islam at the university's department of chemistry is researching new materials to use in rechargeable lithium batteries.

Professor Islam hopes to develop a battery which is lighter, safer and more efficient in storing energy.

His research recently won the Fuel Cell Science & Technology Award from the Royal Society of Chemistry.

'Cutting carbon'

Pofessor Islam said: "Hybrid electric cars such as the Toyota Prius rely on petrol engines, with their batteries being charged by the waste energy from braking.

"These cars provide better fuel economy for urban driving than a conventional car.

"Developing new materials holds the key to lighter and more efficient rechargeable batteries for hybrid electric cars, reducing our use of fossil fuels and cutting carbon emissions."

Conventional metal-hydride batteries are already available for both petrol and electric cars but are heavy and limit the car's power.

Professor Islam's research will be presented at the Sustainable Energy and the Environment research showcase on 17 September at the University of Bath.


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