Page last updated at 11:25 GMT, Monday, 2 June 2008 12:25 UK

Stage two of seafront work begins

View along Weston-super-Mare's seafront
The seafront project is expected to be finished by 2010

Work has begun on the second phase of a 29m project to improve the seafront at Weston-super-Mare.

This stage involves a "scour protection apron", designed to prevent the tide from undermining the existing sea wall between Knightstone and the Grand Pier.

It consists of stepped pre-cast concrete units, most of which will be buried beneath the beach.

Metal sheet piles will be delivered to the beach, near the Tropicana site, in preparation for them to be installed.

They will be transported down the beach 160 metres from the promenade by escorted tractor and trailer, making about 20 journeys per day.

Tight schedule

In areas where the apron will be above current beach levels, natural stones will be inset into the surface, providing seating in places.

Councillor Elfan Ap Rees, North Somerset Council's deputy leader, said: "Work on this phase has to begin now in order to meet the tight schedule set for completion of this project.

"But we will ensure as much of the beach area north of the Grand Pier will remain usable and of course most of the main beach will be unaffected."

The third phase will involve the strengthening of the existing sea wall, a secondary "splash wall" at the rear of the promenade between Knightstone and the Grand Pier and upgrading of the surfacing, street lighting and furniture along the promenade from Marine Lake to Royal Sands.

These works are still being designed and will be brought before councillors in the summer.


SEE ALSO
Resort's revamped seafront open
03 May 08 |  Somerset

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