Page last updated at 17:05 GMT, Tuesday, 21 October 2008 18:05 UK

Rabies strain found in dead bat

Daubenton bat - generic
Seven bats in the UK have been found to have the virus since 1996.

A strain of bat rabies which can be transferred to humans was discovered in the carcass of a bat found in Shropshire.

Defra confirmed the presence of European Bat Lyssavirus (EBLV) after tests carried out at the Veterinary Laboratories Agency in Surrey.

A spokesman said there was no evidence that anyone had been bitten or scratched by the Daubenton's bat.

Seven bats in the UK have been found to have the virus since 1996.

Protected species

Government advice is that bats are a protected species so should not be killed or have their roosts damaged.

EBLV may only be transmitted by bites, so there is no risk to humans if they are left alone.

Guidance suggests anyone bitten by a bat should wash the wound and immediately seek medical advice.

Daubenton's bats are common throughout England and Wales.




SEE ALSO
'Rabid' bat found on river path
10 Oct 06 |  Oxfordshire
Health warning over 'rabid' bats
14 Jun 05 |  Manchester
Rabid bat discovered in UK town
28 Sep 04 |  Health
Study rules out bat rabies threat
20 Feb 04 |  Scotland
Bats 'exposed to rabies virus'
02 Oct 03 |  Scotland

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
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FROM OTHER NEWS SITES
Winchester Sun Rabies: It's here, it's real - 30 hrs ago
Telegraph Bat carrying rabies found in Shropshire - 43 hrs ago



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