Page last updated at 17:22 GMT, Thursday, 17 September 2009 18:22 UK

Manure dumped at Clarkson's home

Climate Rush campaigners holding a banner by the horse manure
The protesters said they were "blasť" about dumping the manure

Climate change protesters have dumped a pile of horse manure at the home of Top Gear presenter Jeremy Clarkson in a protest about vehicle emissions.

Six women stood by the dung in the drive of his home in Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire, with a sign that read: "This is what you're landing us in."

The protesters from direct action group Climate Rush said they were being as "blasé as him" about emissions.

Clarkson made no comment and Thames Valley Police said no-one was arrested.

Horse-drawn cart

Police were called to the presenter's home at about 1145 BST after reports that a group of women dressed as suffragettes, three camera crews and a few members of the press were in the grounds of his house.

A wheel barrow load of manure from a horse-drawn cart was dumped in Clarkson's driveway.

Protester Deborah Grayson said: "Just as he's ever so blasé about his CO2 and how much he's contributing to climate change emissions, we're a little bit blasé about our horse manure."

Sgt Mark Smith, from Thames Valley Police, said the women, camera crews and press had left the property by the time the officers arrived.

He said no complaints had been lodged against the protesters.

It is not known if Clarkson was home at the time of the protest.



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