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Last Updated: Sunday, 18 February 2007, 11:40 GMT
Anger over dumping of waste ash
Protest
Campaigners claim the company has ignored locals' concerns
Campaigners trying to stop a company filling an Oxfordshire lake with waste have taken part in a protest march.

Environmental groups staged the demonstration over plans by RWE Npower to fill Radley Lakes with waste ash from Didcot Power Station.

Andy Boddington, of the Campaign for Rural England, said: "The community loves this landscape, they love Thrupp Lake and they love the wildlife."

RWE Npower said it was disposing of the ash "in a responsible way".

The protest march on Saturday passed off peacefully.

Rare species

On its website the company said: "We are committed to carrying out ash disposal in a responsible way and the impact of work upon local residents will be kept to an absolute minimum.

"We will keep local people informed about all activity. Npower has been disposing of ash and restoring the old gravel pits at Radley since the mid-1980s with very few problems and we will ensure this continues."

But the Save Radley Lakes group claim the area is home to rare species that will be wiped out if the waste disposal goes ahead.

The campaigners said the company has ignored their concerns and is continuing with its plans despite local opposition.




SEE ALSO
One arrested after lake protest
14 Feb 07 |  Oxfordshire
Lake protesters evicted from site
06 Feb 07 |  Oxfordshire
Protesters refuse to give up Radley
24 Jan 07 |  Oxfordshire
Attempt to move protesters fails
10 Jan 07 |  Oxfordshire
Schoolgirl presents lake petition
02 Jan 07 |  Oxfordshire
Lake waste dump plans approved
11 Jul 06 |  Oxfordshire

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