Page last updated at 06:30 GMT, Monday, 1 March 2010

Nottinghamshire council boss describes money pressures

The chief executive of Nottinghamshire County Council has said the authority is facing financial pressures "unprecedented in its history".

Under an 'improvement plan' launched by the authority, 1,000 jobs will go in addition to 468 posts which are going in the next year.

Mick Burrows said the council was facing a huge challenge over the next few years, but was equipped to meet it.

The council has unveiled a plan to save £200m over the next five years.

The Chief Executive of Nottinghamshire County Council, Mick Burrows
The Chief Executive of Nottinghamshire County Council, Mick Burrows

The council says it is having to save money in some areas in order to spend more on other services which are facing extra demand, such as child protection and adult social care and health.

Mr Burrows says the challenge over the next five years will be immense.

"We've got to find about £200m to recycle or save to actually balance the books and meet those service pressures," he said. "That's pretty unprecedented in the history of this council's working.

"It's not undeliverable and I believe it presents an opportunity for us to actually modernise certain bits of the authority."

The council has already announced it is planning to shed about 1,500 jobs over the next three years.

Union officials say they are concerned about the scale of the job losses.

In a BBC survey, Mr Burrows predicted the council's spending would be cut by between 5% and 10% in the next three to five years.



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