Page last updated at 17:17 GMT, Wednesday, 25 March 2009

Pink lights put off spotty teens

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Residents put teens in bad light

Residents of a Nottinghamshire housing estate have installed pink lights which show up teenagers' spots in a bid to stop them gathering in the area.

Members of Layton Burroughs Residents' Association, Mansfield say they have bought the lights in a bid to curb anti-social behaviour.

The lights are said to have a calming influence, but they also highlight skin blemishes.

The National Youth Agency said it would just move the problem somewhere else.

Peta Halls, development officer for the NYA, said: "Anything that aims to embarrass people out of an area is not on.

"The pink lights are indiscriminate in that they will impact on all young people and older people who do not, perhaps, have perfect skin.

They have a right to congregate, it's part of being a teenager
Peta Halls, National Youth Agency

"Why waste limited resources on something which moves all young people out of an area? They will move on to somewhere else.

"They have a right to congregate, it's part of being a teenager and most young people are good, law-abiding people."

The lights have been installed in three underpasses on the estate.

Tony Gelsthorpe, chairman of the Layton Burroughs Residents' Association, said the lights were important for the residents.

"We've had problems with underage drinking, drug dealing, anti-social behaviour and general intimidation.

"I was a little bit dubious about the pink lights at first but it's done the trick. We've got to think of our residents and we've got to live here at the end of the day."



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