Page last updated at 12:55 GMT, Wednesday, 17 December 2008

Greenbelt housing plan confirmed

Clifton Meadows
Clifton Meadows is located on the southern edge of Nottingham

A major builder has confirmed it wants to put more than 5,500 homes on greenbelt land near Nottingham.

Barratt Homes said one third of the houses at Clifton Meadows would be affordable housing.

The government has identified the site as a possible location for the Nottingham Gateway project.

Gotham Parish Council chairman Trevor Vennett-Smith has opposed the idea, saying residents wanted to protect their rural way of life.

'Least harm'

"I was always brought to believe that the greenbelt was meant to protect the rural environment from the city, Mr Vennett-Smith said.

"But this huge development is of absolutely huge proportions - 5,000-plus houses, schools, doctors - it is like building a new town."

Robert Galij from Barratt Homes said: "The south of Nottingham has been identified by the Secretary of State as an appropriate location for significant growth as it will cause 'least harm' to the greenbelt."

The government wants 28,000 new homes in Nottingham and a further 16,500 in Rushcliffe by 2028.

The Nottingham Gateway would have three new schools, a health centre and be linked to the city by tram.

A public exhibition of the Nottingham Gateway plans will be displayed on 17 January and a leaflet outlining the gateway project will be delivered to 13,000 homes in nearby Barton in Fabis, Clifton, Gotham, Ruddington and Thrumpton.

The firm expects to submit a planning application to Rushcliffe Borough Council in early 2009.

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Barratt Homes wants to build the housing estate just south of Nottingham



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