Page last updated at 18:35 GMT, Tuesday, 4 November 2008

City embraces Robin Hood again

Slanted N logo
The "N" will still be used in some campaigns but not by the city council

Robin Hood is making a comeback as the symbol of the city of Nottingham after having been replaced by a modern logo.

Nottingham City Council has been using a slanted "N" alongside its own logo to represent the city.

The "N" was the logo developed by Experience Nottinghamshire - an official tourist board for the county.

Deputy city leader Graham Chapman said the council had not paid for the creation of the "N" and a new logo would be phased in gradually.

Powerful brand

He said: "I don't think it's ever gone down that well.

"Robin Hood is a far more powerful brand internationally. People are far more attracted to Robin Hood than a slanty 'N'.

City of Nottingham logo
The city council used a modern Robin Hood logo in the past

"A Chinese delegation came over a few weeks ago and the thing they knew about was Robin Hood.

"We gave them some cufflinks with the 'N' on and we had to explain to them that it was not a 'Z'."

The "big N" brand cost 125,000 to develop, Experience Nottinghamshire said.

A spokeswoman said it would continue to use the "big N" and urged event organisers and other organisations to do so as well.

John Healey of Experience Nottinghamshire said he was disappointed by the decision.

Nottingham North MP Graham Allen said: "We need to get rid of the 'wonky N' and capitalise on our internationally renowned Robin Hood brand."

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