Page last updated at 16:46 GMT, Wednesday, 8 October 2008 17:46 UK

People duped over TV work scam

People have been conned out of large sums of money by a company claiming it could help them get work on television, a BBC investigation has revealed.

Nottingham-based Broadcast Support advertised in magazines and placed banners illegally on roundabouts and busy road junctions.

Its website said everyone was suitable for television and voiceover work.

The company promised clients would find lucrative media work and people paid for costly showreels and websites.

I was told I had everything that the industry wanted in the way of personality, voice, whatever
John Dick, Derbyshire

The BBC Inside Out East Midlands investigation discovered people in tears and unable to sleep after losing their life savings to the scam.

The man behind the company is Carl Mould. He has also used the names Carl Nicholas, Nicholas Karl and Carl Mole.

Vulnerable, elderly people were among those taken in by the company's promises.

In one case a recently widowed woman spent 21,000 on a poor-quality DVD showreel and website.

John Dick from Derbyshire spent 10,000 on a DVD and a website page.

He said it was a chance to earn some extra money.

Banner

"I was told I had everything that the industry wanted in the way of personality, voice, whatever.

"You're given that confidence by people like this to do better, at a cost, and that's the brunt - you don't need any of this to be on an agency's book."

Actor Clive Hurst has campaigned for tough action against such scams and has taken up Mr Dick's case.

"This particular case is the worst case I've ever come across and I'm absolutely gobsmacked at the amounts involved," he said.

We seek to provide individuals who wish to try and enter the broadcasting industry with the tools and materials to maximise their potential
Broadcast Support statement

The company claimed a wealth of experience and contacts within the media industry.

The company carried BBC logos and other industry names on its website without permission from those organisations.

The BBC's litigation department forced Broadcast Support to remove all copyrighted logos from its site.

Other logos used without consent include Disney, Channel Four and the Discovery Channel.

Prison term

Carl Mould previously worked in the building trade.

He was jailed for three years in 2001 for deception.

Mr Mould keeps within the law on his website by saying he is not an agent.

In a statement he said: "Broadcast Support is not an employment agency and does not hold itself out as being such.

"We seek to provide individuals who wish to try and enter the broadcasting industry with the tools and materials to maximise their potential.

"We do not guarantee work and the materials we provide are in line with industry norms and standards, as is our pricing. We have many satisfied clients."

Advertisement

Carl Mould has served a jail term for deception




RELATED BBC LINKS



FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2013 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific