Page last updated at 10:50 GMT, Tuesday, 19 August 2008 11:50 UK

Parking ticket tally is defended

Almost 12,500 parking tickets have been issued in Nottinghamshire in the three months since the county council took over responsibility from the police.

Officials said there were no targets for tickets and the aim was to make town centres easier places to use.

Some areas, like Mansfield, have seen double the number of tickets handed out compared to other areas like Gedling.

Over the same period the city council, which also took over duties from the police, issued about 15,500 tickets.

'Tangible' benefits

Gareth Johnson, civil parking enforcement project manager for Nottinghamshire, said the number equated to one ticket per parking attendant hour.

"There are no targets whatsoever. It is not a target we are particularly proud of and what we are interested in are the tangible benefits in the town centres, the improvements to the parking that is going on at the moment.

"As long as the service pays for itself, the council tax payers of Nottinghamshire have enough to pay for without paying for parking enforcement as well."

Ashfield district saw 1,467 tickets issued, with Bassetlaw had 2,173, Broxtowe 1,533, Gedling 1,038, Mansfield 2,474, Newark 1,646 and Rushcliffe 2,121.

Mr Johnson said some of the discrepancies were down to how quickly staff were put in place but were also influenced by the number of cars using an area.

Parking in a prohibited area, such as on double yellow lines, carries a 70 fine. For overstaying, the fine is 50.


SEE ALSO
Parking levy plan takes next step
15 Jul 08 |  Nottinghamshire
Town left without traffic wardens
02 Feb 05 |  Nottinghamshire
Congestion charge sunk by council
09 May 08 |  Nottinghamshire

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