Page last updated at 12:08 GMT, Tuesday, 8 April 2008 13:08 UK

Lecturer's anatomical 'cook book'

Ribs
Ribs are a favourite recipe

A lecturer at the University of Nottingham has devised a "cook book" to help his students learn about anatomy.

The culinary guide, which shows people how to study meat from an animal before cooking it, has been produced by biomechanics expert Donal McNally.

He said the book - which includes photos and diagrams - is not a commercial venture, just a creative teaching tool.

The Anatomy Cook Book is distributed free to Dr McNally's students.

Cartilage is nice and smooth and shiny
Donal McNally

"It's another way of learning," he said.

"If you have a look at pictures in anatomy books, no matter how good they are, they are flat and two-dimensional.

"This is about actually getting in there and feeling what a joint is like, and getting a feel for what the materials are like."

Dr McNally's recipe for maple-glazed spare ribs is described as "an ideal start to study the ribs and costal cartilages as well as muscles of the thoracic wall".

The ribs recipe was a favourite among his students, he said.

Suggested oven times and ingredients are mentioned alongside terms like "neuro-vascular bundle" and "parietal pleura".

Dr McNally said: "You can tell people that cartilage is nice and smooth and shiny, but until you actually see it and feel it, you have no real idea."


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