Page last updated at 17:34 GMT, Wednesday, 30 September 2009 18:34 UK

Replacement homes face bulldozer

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A former Argyle Street squatter said the authorities were warned it was a difficult site on which to build.

Homes on a street in Norwich which were built to replace properties demolished 25 years ago could now be facing the bulldozer because of subsidence.

Norwich City Council is considering plans to pull down 19 properties in Argyle Street in the city centre because of structural faults.

A group of squatters were forcibly removed by police and terraced homes they occupied were demolished in 1985.

Some of those buildings now have large internal cracks in them.

Norwich City Council has not revealed the cost of the demolition and redevelopment.

There are now only 10 people living on the street.

Councillor Brenda Arthur, who is responsible for housing, said: "Two properties have been sold under right to buy legislation and the owners will be entitled to compensation equivalent to the market price of the homes plus 10%."

Others in Argyle Street who are city council tenants will receive £4,700 compensation and be re-housed, the council said.



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