Page last updated at 23:04 GMT, Sunday, 6 September 2009 00:04 UK

County promoted using joke phrase

Steve Coogan
Alan Partridge, played by Steve Coogan, became a Norfolk stereotype

A council is to use the negative phrase "normal for Norfolk" in a campaign to promote the county in a positive light.

The phrase has often been used by comedians to suggest people from Norfolk are behind the times.

Norfolk County Council is launching an advertising campaign with the tag-line "World Class is Normal for Norfolk".

The aim is to promote the area as an attractive holiday destination and business base by turning the negative stereotype view on its head.

"Norfolk has historically suffered from outdated perceptions and stereotypes reinforced by the likes of Alan Partridge and Jeremy Clarkson - and even Noel Coward," said a council spokesman.

"Now we are turning the old stereotype 'Normal for Norfolk' - a phrase formerly used to denigrate the county and its inhabitants - on its head.

"We are going to use it as branding in a major campaign to position the county as a world-class place to work."

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