Page last updated at 11:39 GMT, Tuesday, 15 September 2009 12:39 UK

Work starts on 17m cancer centre

Marina and Kenny Dalglish
Marina Dalglish said travelling long distances for treatment can be hard

Liverpool legend Kenny Dalglish and his wife Marina attended an event to mark the development of a £17m satellite cancer centre.

Partly funded by The Marina Dalglish Appeal, the radiotherapy clinic will specialise in treating brain and skull-based tumours.

Mrs Dalglish, who was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2003, has helped raise the profile of the killer disease.

The centre, due to open in 2010, will be based at The Walton Centre, Aintree.

Staffed by Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology's radiographers and doctors, it will house three radiotherapy treatment machines, which will ensure patients across Merseyside will not have to travel as far for treatment.

'Landmark centre'

"The work done at Clatterbridge is second to none, but a long uncomfortable car journey when you are trying to deal with the effects of cancer can be very hard.

This new cancer centre in Liverpool will benefit from the expertise of Clatterbridge staff and a location that will ease the burden of the journey through the tunnel.

"We are so excited to be involved in what will be a magnificent facility," Mrs Dalglish said.

The centre, which will be the second on Merseyside, has also received a lot of its funding from The Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust.

Andrew Cannell, acting chief executive at Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology, said: "It's with great pleasure we are able to mark the start of the building work on this landmark centre for Liverpool."



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